The Banjo Glossary Project 2019  
Tuesday, January 22, 2019

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01:24The terms "peghead," "head" and "headstock" refer to the end of the neck that holds the tuning machines or pegs. Most banjo pegheads have four tuning pegs that pass through the peghead from the back. Some, particularly older instruments have slotted pegheads where two longitudinal slots are cut into the peghead and classical guitar type tuners are used.

Zither Banjos from the early 1900s often have all five tuners on the peghead with the fifth string disappearing into a small hole in the fretboard just aft of the fifth string nut, passing through a tiny brass tube, and reappearing behind the nut at the base of the peghead (a design still used by some luthiers today).

Most banjos have a peghead overlay. This is a thin piece of wood, usually ebony, rosewood or black-dyed pearwood that covers the face of the peghead providing a nice contrasting background for decorative inlay work and adds to the visual appeal of the instrument.

Guitars usually have tuning devices called "tuning machines," "tuners," "gears" or "machine heads."

Strictly speaking, there is a difference between a "peghead" and a "headstock." A peghead holds tuning pegs, while a headstock holds tuning machines, or gears. However, for all practical purposes, the terms are interchangeable.
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LAST UPDATED 05-10-2016 21:11


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LAST UPDATE AUGUST 19, 2018 AT 12:25 PM